Gnocchetti sardi fatti in casa
Homemade Sardinian Pasta Shells

About This Recipe

Are you looking for a delicious recipe with a difference? If you are, you’ve found it! Here’s my homemade sardinian pasta shells for you to enjoy.

Making pasta can be a bit of a chore, but gnocchetti sardi (also known as malloreddus) is really easy. You don’t need a pasta machine – just mix, roll, shape and cook. Unlike most other types of home-made pasta, which contain eggs, the dough for these shells is made from flour and water, giving the pasta a firmer texture. The shells are best served with a chunky sauce such as a ragù made from spicy Italian pork sausages (see page 42) or clams (see page 44). You can prepare the shells a day before you need them, but store them in a cool, dry place on a floured tray.

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4

Serves

2

Ingredients

Pasta Recipes

Type

Ingredients

  • 500g '00' grade pasta flour (plus extra for dusting)
  • half a teaspoon Fine salt

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Feast your eyes on the finest homemade sardinian pasta shells! It’s straightforward and fun to make this great dish. Simply follow the instructions below and get the perfect result.

Step By Step

  1. Place the flour in a large bowl. Make a well in the centre. Pour in 300ml warm water and sprinkle over the salt. Using the handle of a wooden spoon, gradually mix the flour into the liquid and stir well to combine. Once the texture is crumbly, like breadcrumbs, turn out the mixture onto a well-floured work surface.
  2. Use your hands to bring the dough together and knead for 2 minutes. You want to create a pliable dough. If it becomes too soft, add a little more flour.
  3. Divide the dough into 6 pieces and roll each piece beneath the palms of your hands to make several long ‘ropes’, each about the thickness of your little finger. Use a sharp knife to cut across to make 1cm pieces. Dust with a little flour.
  4. Place a piece of dough on the very fine side of a grater and press against it using your thumb to flatten slightly so that the imprint makes little nodules on one side of the shells.
  5. Place the prepared shells in a single layer on a floured tray until you are ready to cook them.
  6. Cook the gnocchetti in a large pan of boiling, salted water for about 2 minutes or until they float to the surface. Drain thoroughly and serve with a sauce of your choice.

Once you’re done, simply sit back and enjoy your homemade sardinian pasta shells and don’t forget to check out other great authentic Italian recipes including great antipasti recipes, Italian pasta recipes, Italian soup recipes, Italian beef dishes and authentic pizza recipes.

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